Still I Rise

odditiesoflife:

Red-Lipped Batfish

At Curious History, we love strange animals. They show just how diversified animal species are on this planet and how so many them, if seen out of their native habitat, look more like creatures from science fiction novels. Evolution has created an innumerable amount of unusual life forms and the red-lipped batfish (Ogcocepphalus darwini) is no exception. 

Native to the Galapagos Islands, this fish moves from place to place using modified fins to “walk” across the ocean floor instead of swim, as they are bottom dwelling creatures. It is believed that the function of the bright red lips may be to enhance species recognition during spawning.

source 1, 2

shychemist:

And because of tumblr’s character limit I’ve had to split the post into two parts:

Part 1

Part 2

Now for the new blogs!

THIS LIST HAS BEEN UPDATED AS OF FEBRUARY 14, 2014.

Please Reblog this to give the new blogs exposure. Thank you.

New Blogs added:

Anthropology

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Buoyant convection, driven by temperature-dependent changes in density, is a major force here on Earth. It’s responsible for mixing in the oceans, governs the shape of flames, and drives weather patterns. The images above show flow patterns caused by buoyant convection. The colors come from liquid crystal beads immersed in the fluid; red indicates cooler fluid and blue indicates warmer fluid. You can see plumes of warmer fluid rising in some of the photos. At the same time, though, the images are beautiful simply as art and are strongly reminiscent of works by Vincent van Gogh. (Image credit: J. Zhang et al.)

awkwardsituationist:

photo by jordi chias of an endangered green sea turtle off the coast of tenerife 

awkwardsituationist:

photo by jordi chias of an endangered green sea turtle off the coast of tenerife 

theoceaniswonderful:

untitled by Sandy Chou
magicalnaturetour:

Kyle McBurnie ~ His cute seal won the 2013 Underwater Photography Contest hosted by the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science.

magicalnaturetour:

Kyle McBurnie ~ His cute seal won the 2013 Underwater Photography Contest hosted by the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science.

fastcompany:

It’s no secret that the world’s ocean trash problem is getting bad; looking at a handful of images from the Texas-sized Pacific garbage patch should be enough to convince anyone. As for all of our litter that doesn’t end up in the middle of the ocean? It often stays close to shore, where volunteers for Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup pick some of it up, cataloging all the items they find. 
The 10 types of trash that are littering our beaches

fastcompany:

It’s no secret that the world’s ocean trash problem is getting bad; looking at a handful of images from the Texas-sized Pacific garbage patch should be enough to convince anyone. As for all of our litter that doesn’t end up in the middle of the ocean? It often stays close to shore, where volunteers for Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup pick some of it up, cataloging all the items they find. 

The 10 types of trash that are littering our beaches

rhamphotheca:

The Top 3 Lessons Learned From Marine Protected Areas Around the World

by Samantha Murray

We may be from more than 80 countries and we don’t all speak the same language, but after just two days, the 1200 participants at the 3rd International Marine Protected Areas Congress in Marseille, France are bonding. We all believe marine protected areas (MPAs) play an important role in the future of our ocean. Throw in some shared awe over a bowl of bouillabaisse (so. much. fish!) and a few bottles of Provençal rosé, and we’ve got more than enough fodder to fill five days of conversation.

The best part of these conversations is their authenticity and substance. Like a secret handshake we all learned during our years spent advocating for, designing, monitoring or otherwise implementing MPAs, we’ve got a shorthand that—in spite of our differences—allows us to speak in a single language about protecting our global ocean. As a result, three things keep resonating in the presentations and conversations at IMPAC3…

(read more: National Geographic)

photos: NOAA and Heal the Bay